Investigative Journal June 16 2011 Broadcast

Jesuits and Stalin: Like Father Like Son

By Greg Szymanski

Don’t miss my broadcast todayas the true history of Fr. Joseph Stalin is revealed.

Trained a Jesuit, he was one of their star pupils tutored to be the world’s top mass murderer.

Josef Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili (December 18, 1878 – March 5, 1953), better known by his adopted name, Joseph Stalin (stalin meaning “made of steel”. Josef was born to influential Catholic parents Vissarion “Beso” Dzhugashvili and Ekaterina “Keke” Geladze. His father Beso was a successful and relatively wealthy local businessman. However, in later biographies, he is variously described as poor, dirt poor and a violent alcoholic. Whatever the real truth, Josef was accepted into the Catholic Cappuchin run school at Gori.
He graduated in 1892 first in his class and at the age of 14 he was accepted to enter the “Orthodox” Seminary of Tiflis (Tbilisi, Georgia), a Jesuit institution to be trained as a Jesuit priest. In spite of contrary history written about the Jesuit run seminary, the Jesuits remained in Russian territory after the order was banned by Alexander I in 1820, maintaining control of several institutions, including the Seminary of Tiflis. Stalin himself openly admitted the Jesuit control of the institution in his famous interview with Jewish Journalist Emil Ludwig (Cohen):

Ludwig) What impelled you to become an oppositionist?
Was it, perhaps, bad treatment by your parents?
Stalin) No. My parents were uneducated, but they did not treat me badly by any means. But it was a different matter at the Orthodox theological seminary which I was then attending. In protest against the outrageous regime and the Jesuitical methods prevalent at the seminary, I was ready to become, and actually did become, a revolutionary, a believer in Marxism as a really revolutionary teaching.

Ludwig) But do you not admit that the Jesuits have good points?
Stalin) Yes, they are systematic and persevering in working to achieve sordid ends but their principal method is spying, prying, worming their way into people’s souls and outraging their feelings.
What good can there be in that?
For instance, the spying in the hostel. At nine o’clock the bell rings for morning tea, we go to the dining-room, and when we return to our rooms we find that meantime a search has been made and all our chests have been ransacked … What good point can there be in that?

At Tiflis, Stalin’s closest friend was fellow classmate Krikor Bedros Aghajanian, the future Grégoire-Pierre Cardinal Agagianian, a powerful and ruthless Catholic cardinal who went on to control the death camps in Siberia under Stalin’s rule. While accounts of his time at Tiflis have been changed many times, it is universally accepted that Stalin was the star pupil of the seminary.

As a result, the events of 1899 remain shrouded in mystery. In the final week of his studies, having completed seven years as the star pupil of the Jesuits, Stalin is variously claimed to have quit or been expelled. Neither account adequately explains how a seminary student of seven years suddenly appeared influential and active in coordinating the Georgian Social-Democratic movement less than 12 months later – an achievement that could not possibly have happened without substantial support.
The more credible and controversial conclusion is that Stalin did graduate from the Jesuit Seminary as a proper Jesuit priest, with his first assignment being to infiltrate and manage the Georgian underground against the Russian Tsarist Government. Again, the fact that Stalin was awarded an academic position at the Tiflis Observatory gives credence to his Jesuit credentials and completed study. Continue reading

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